header 3.JPG
header 3.JPG

Statelessness Network Asia Pacific


SCROLL DOWN

Statelessness Network Asia Pacific


The Statelessness Network Asia Pacific (SNAP) is a civil society coalition with the goal of promoting collaboration on addressing statelessness in Asia and the Pacific.

 Mapping and registration of stateless populations of Indian origin by DHRRA Malaysia in Peninsular Malaysia

Mapping and registration of stateless populations of Indian origin by DHRRA Malaysia in Peninsular Malaysia

A stateless person is not recognised as a citizen by any State.

As a result, stateless people often have limited or no access to fundamental human rights such as education, employment, housing, and health services, and are often unable to pay taxes, buy and sell property, open a bank account or register a birth, marriage or death. 

Stateless people are also at a heightened risk of exploitation, human trafficking, arrest and arbitrary detention because they often have difficulty proving who they are or links to a State.   

There are at least ten million stateless people worldwide, with the largest proportion of this population in Asia and the Pacific.   The main causes of statelessness in our region are nationality laws, policies and practices that discriminate on the basis of gender, ethnicity and/or religion, as well as gaps in nationality laws, policies and practices.

RATIONALE FOR SNAP

Civil society actors are in a unique position to respond to the challenge of statelessness in Asia and the Pacific through civil society’s existing direct engagement with affected populations and decision makers. In fact, there are many examples across the region where civil society actors, in collaboration with governmental actors and UN agencies, have successfully addressed statelessness for specific populations.  

However, before SNAP's launch there was limited collaboration and information sharing between civil society actors on lessons learned and strategies used to address statelessness. Therefore, SNAP aims to bridge this gap. Collaboration and exchange between civil society actors enhances individual actors’ impact and creates opportunities for collective action.